2nd Trip to Luputa V: trip from Mwene Ditu to Luputa

Some sights leaving Mwene Ditu:

Mwene Ditu (125) Mwene Ditu (126)

Mwene Ditu (122) Mwene Ditu (121) Mwene Ditu (120)

Mwene Ditu (119) Mwene Ditu (118) Mwene Ditu (117) Mwene Ditu (116) Mwene Ditu (115) Mwene Ditu (114) Mwene Ditu (113)

For some reason, I found the street coffins interesting (and they were near our hotel), so I went to talk to them. The wood coffin goes for $45,000 franks (about $45), while the purple one is $35,000. For an extra $15,000 franks they will also bury you.

Mwene Ditu (123) Mwene Ditu (124)

Some sights of our drive to Luputa:

Road to Laputa (2) Road to Laputa (3) Road to Laputa (4) Road to Laputa (5) Road to Laputa (6) Road to Laputa (7) Road to Laputa (8) Road to Laputa (9) Road to Laputa (10) Road to Laputa (11) Road to Laputa (12) Road to Laputa (13)

Road to Laputa (20) Road to Laputa (23) Road to Laputa (24) Road to Laputa (25) Road to Laputa (26) Road to Laputa (27) Road to Laputa (28) Road to Laputa (29) Road to Laputa (30) Road to Laputa (31) Road to Laputa (32) Road to Laputa (33)

Road to Laputa (34) Road to Laputa (35) Road to Laputa (36) Road to Laputa (38) Road to Laputa (39) Road to Laputa (44) Road to Laputa (46) Road to Laputa (43) Road to Laputa (53)

We had no problems on this leg of the trip, other than our bodies banging around in the car from all the deep ruts in the road.

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2 Responses to 2nd Trip to Luputa V: trip from Mwene Ditu to Luputa

  1. John Grace says:

    Between June and end August1961 I often travelled this route as a UN soldier with the Irish United Nations Forces At that time there was an American missiionary in Kashia named Mr John Davis or Davies. He had a small plane. It was customary for us to slaughter a steer in Kashia and transport the meat to our garrison in Mwene Ditu covered in white water soaked sheets in order to keep the meat fresh! Our doctor apart from tending to the needs of the troops and the natives also acted as a butcher We inherited two small wars, an outbreak of smallpox and a famine and like to think that when leaving we left behind a reasonably stable situation. Actually we were accorded a civic reception at each railway station we steamed through, the natives bedecked in surplus Irish Army uniforms suitably tailored! What a sight!! The steam train with three engines was surely 200 yards long transporting all our vehicles etc back to Kamina.Living conditions in Mwene Ditu, under canvas were so bad that Nigerian troops refused to accupy our camp after our departure. It is refreshing to know that your mission is ttransforming the area spiritually and by extension materially. I am really enjoying the various accounts of life brought to reality by the excellent photographs. I would appreciate any information on the area, which I hope to visit. Keep up the good work–John Grace

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